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Cottagers and residents of Bedford County, Ontario have found out what it means to lose the mineral rights to your property. If someone wants to prospect or develop a mine in your front yard, you are only entitled to compensation, not to stop it. Bedford is in the Rideau Lakes area of the province about a half hour north of Kingston, near Westport. It is a mixture of local people and cottagers. Many of the cottagers have had their property for years and intend to retire there. Tourism is a major economic generator in the region. The community, including the Mayor, is upset because a company...
There is growing public concern about the condition of fresh water in Canada. Mining affects fresh water through heavy use of water in processing ore, and through water pollution from discharged mine effluent and seepage from tailings and waste rock impoundments. There are various regulatory and voluntary efforts underway to deal with the problem of water pollution from mining. Metal Mining Effluent Regulations: On July 28, 2001, the proposed Metal Mining Effluent Regulation (MMER) was posted on Canada Gazette Part I, for a 60-day comment period, ending September 26, 2001. The MMERs are an...
In early October, Catherine Coumans visited the Philippines to work with three partner communities. We report on two issues — Placer Dome 's responsibility for the perilous situation in Marinduque, and Crew Development Corporation 's efforts to establish a nickel mine in Mindoro despite determined local opposition. Placer Dome Subject of Congressional Inquiry: Ordered to Fix Dams at Former Operations On October 3, Catherine went with a delegation of elected officials from mining-affected municipalities in Marinduque to visit Ian Lewis, President of Placer Dome's subsidiary (PDTS) in Manila...
Ownership - Sutton Resources Ltd. 1 Sutton Resources was incorporated under the laws of British Columbia on December 4, 1979. In 1996, the company had a number of subsidiaries. One of these was Kahama Mining Corporation which was incorporated in Tanzania, but was owned 100% by Romanex International Limited, which was - in turn - owned 100% by Sutton Resources. Sutton also owned 100% of Tanzania-incorporated Kabanga Nickel and Kagera Mining Company. In March 1999, all the assets of Sutton Resources, including Kahama Mining Corporation, were acquired by Barrick Gold. Sutton was a mineral...
On September 27, 2001, MiningWatch Canada, the NGO Working Group on the Export Development Corporation and the Council of Canadians held a press conference to publicly release a video about the removal of small scale miners in Bulyanhulu in August 1996. At that time we called for an independent international inquiry into the nature of the removals. To the press conference, we invited Tundu Lissu, a human rights lawyer with the Lawyer's Environmental Action Team in Tanzania. Lissu had spent considerable time in the past year investigating rumours that in August 1996 anywhere from 30,000 to 400...
As a preamble to our comments on the proposed amendments to the Metal Mining Liquid Effluent Regulation under the Fisheries Act, I would like to convey our appreciation for the many years of work that you and your colleagues in Environment Canada and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans have invested in the review and modernization of this regulation. It has been a demanding exercise for the many parties involved, but I expect for none more than for you and your department. You are to be commended for having kept the process in forward motion, and for having now reached this important...
The CEN Mining Caucus and AQUAMIN Reference Group participants to the MMLER review process rooted their recommendations on how to modernize the MMLERs on principles that they outlined in comments to Environment Canada in 1999 (March 1999; June 1999). These principles have already been recognized as being key to protecting environmental and human health in precursor processes, such as AQUAMIN, and in the Whitehorse Mining Initiative.
Is it good enough to protect the health of Canadians, or our fish, wildlife, and water? Ten years ago, Environment Canada set out to strengthen and update the regulation for mine effluent. Pollution from mines can harm the environment generally, especially for the people and communities that depend on surface and ground water sources and on fish and wildlife for food. A review of the 1977 regulation was undertaken through a series of extensive consultations involving the mining industry, aboriginal and environmental organizations, and federal, provincial, and territorial government agencies. The new Metal Mining Effluent Regulation was released by Environment Canada on 28 July, 2001. ENGO participants in the process are satisfied with some aspects of the new regulation, but remain concerned that it doesn't go far enough to protect aquatic resources. These comments are a summary of comments expressed by some member groups (see list below) of the Mining Caucus of the Canadian Environmental Network.
Increasingly, international organisations such as the OECD, national policy makers and the public are engaging in a pressing debate about the need to promote more sustainable forms of production and consumption. This debate involves questions about the economic value of the environment and the most sustainable use of land and water. It raises questions about social sustainability, how economic activities impact the health and well-being of individuals and communities. This debate informs policy discussions about improving resource conservation, removing perverse subsidies that promote unsustainable economic practices, the role of subsidies in international trade, environmental tax shifting, and rethinking "distorting methods of calculating national wealth that largely dismiss resource wealth and ecological goods and services."
In 1977, the Metal Mining Liquid Effluent Regulations (MMLER) were promulgated under the Fisheries Act. In 1990, the Government of Canada announced its intention to update and strengthen the MMLER in its Green Plan, and the Aquatic Effects of Mining (AQUAMIN) process was established to review the aquatic effects of mining in Canada and make recommendations on improved regulations. In 1996, the results of a multi-stakeholder review of the Regulations were released in a report entitled "AQUAMIN: Assessment of the Aquatic Effects of Mining in Canada." A multi-stakeholder advisory process was...